Glassdoor Takes Its Own Medicine

first_img(+) Easy of useMany users have written in to let us know that the site is well-designed and easy to use. That’s great feedback, especially when I know we can make it even better (and now that we have a full-time designer you’ll begin to see a difference). In the end, I think this is a real point of differentiation for us – we have salaries for a job at a company, not just a job – and when compared to other services I would have to agree that it’s easier to find the information that matters most to you.(-) Need location-based search or filteringOf all our critical feedback, this is the clearly the issue that gets the most attention (1-3 emails a day). And I have to admit it’s well-deserved. Thankfully we’re already working on designs for allowing you to search for salaries and company reviews by city. It gets a lot more complicated when you throw in our international cities because we need to consider other currencies but that just makes it harder not impossible. We’ll get there soon.(+) Quality of the content (balanced, thoughtful, constructive)I remember when we launched there were quite a few naysayers who thought we would be another venting site for disgruntled employees. Well, we proved them wrong. In fact, we have more positive reviews than we have negative (we’ll dig deeper on that in later blog post). Part of the reason we’re able to achieve such high standards is because our “give-to-get” model ensures a more balanced cross-section of all employees, but more importantly we review every post before it goes live on the site to ensure it meets our Community Guidelines and quality standards.(-) Not enough international contentOur international launch generated some serious buzz and it more than validated our suspicion that the need for workplace transparency would know no borders, but it still takes time to get the “give-to-get” model going. For the US, we launched with a solid foundation of employee generated content – but for all our international countries it was harder to tell users to post content of their own if there was nothing to see for their country. With time this issue takes care of itself, and it already has for many of our top countries, but it will require some time to get the word out for our other countries.(+) Great customer careMany of our users have written in with an issue or question, and are often surprised when they get a personal email response (let alone from our CEO or VP). Well, we do our best to respond to every email and if it’s an issue we can fix – we promise to do our best. In many cases, such as the search issue above, we’re not just responding to the issue but letting you know that the solution is already in the works (which always helps!).(-) Not anonymous enoughA few users have said that our service is not anonymous enough for their situation – for example, let’s say they’re the only one with that job title in their office. Well, we want to remind everyone that there are ways to post your salary or review without risking your anonymity. For posting a salary, you don’t even need to specify your company (which means nobody will know it’s you) and for reviews you don’t even need to tell us your location or job title (that’s pretty anonymous). We’re looking for other ways to allow everyone to participate and already have a few ideas, so stay tuned.(+) Always getting betterThis is some of the best feedback to receive. First and foremost, it’s always great to see that our users love the concept behind Glassdoor. Many write in wishing that we were around when they were looking for their last job, but even more write in excited about how the site just keeps getting better. It’s two things – the more content we have the better the experience, but we also have a team of all-stars that are able to continue releasing new features every month. We plan to continue keeping with that tempo of new features, there’s a lot more to come!I hope that sheds a little light on what we’re thinking about at Glassdoor. Like I said, we’re fortunate to have such an engaged community and we want to keep it that way – so expect more of these in the future. We’re listening to all of your feedback, so please keep it coming! We spend a lot of time here at Glassdoor thinking about transparency – how do we use it to help everyone make better career decisions?We’ve been working on solving that fundamental question for awhile now, and to be honest – before we launched we weren’t really sure how our hard work would be received. Now that we’ve launched however, things have changed – we’re no longer just making “good guesses” – we’re fortunate to have an engaged community that will tell us what we’re doing well, and in some cases not so well.Thankfully the feedback from users has been overwhelmingly positive, but in the spirit of practicing what we preach we wanted to share some of the feedback we’ve received from members of the Glassdoor community – the good, the bad and the ugly. So here it is for all to see:last_img read more

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How to Build A Persuasive Resume

first_imgAre you a Jack or Jill of all trades? If so, do you struggle with how to define yourself and your skills within the confines of your resume in a way that appeals to a specific opportunity? The trick is to identify one or two common threads that run through the positions you’ve held and focus in on them. With second and third careers becoming the norm, it’s important to highlight certain abilities you’ve picked up along the way and then present them in a light that benefits a prospective employer.A block of stone once used as a piling, can become a treasured work of art when properly manipulated by a gifted craftsman. It does not cease, however, to be stone. Its strength is simply being utilized in a new way.These examples will help to demonstrate this idea:TeacherNurseCustomer Service RepresentativeEach of the above three jobs require a caring attitude, communication skills and the ability to work well under pressure, abilities that are valuable in any number of fields.Following is a resume snippet that articulates a nurse manager’s transferable skills into a meaty achievement story, along with a special note identifying language substitutions to better resonate with non-healthcare audiences.Enhanced communications with facilities in Texas and Oklahoma by organizing twice-monthly conference calls focused on strategies for improving customer care.Special Note: Substituted ‘facilities’ for ‘hospitals’ and ‘customer’ for ‘patient.’Here’s another set to consider: Truck driver Restaurant Manager Retail salesThe above traverse three professions that require an ability to successfully deal with the public, remain focused for longer than average periods of time and (for the most part) work unsupervised.An example of how a retail sales resume may communicate transferable skills into a rich achievement follows. No special note needed, as language transition was seamless.Improved responsiveness by 50% during customer traffic surges; quelled challenges with difficult clients through more effective relationship management techniques.And finally, see if you can find the common thread between these three occupations:Military ServiceHeavy Equipment OperatorWarehouse SupervisorMilitary personnel must be capable of adapting to ever-changing situations for their own safety as well as those in their company. Certainly, instances occur when a heavy equipment operator must do the same while navigating treacherous terrain. And, a warehouse supervisor may be at a complete loss if those skills are absent when an unexpected delivery arrives or a storage bin suddenly fails.The following resume achievement, based on a Blackhawk helicopter pilot’s experience, weaves in these traits:Safely flew 600 flight hours, exercising situational leadership and fluid intelligence in highly stressful, life-and-death situations.Special Note: Removed the word, ‘combat,’ as in, ‘Safely flew 600 combat flight hours” to tone down the military jargon.As you can see, finding common ground between varying occupations is simply a matter of mining beneath the surface a bit for the vein that connects them. Once this is accomplished, you can use these similarities as the building blocks for a focused resume message that will enable you to secure your next career opportunity.Before writing your next resume, make a list of your duties and achievements in each position you’ve held. Before long, a theme will appear. Be sure to emphasize the strengths that are necessary for the position you desire and you will be well on your way.last_img read more

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Glassdoor Wins Best Places To Work Award 2012, North Bay Business Journal

first_imgWe are thrilled to announce that Glassdoor has been named one of the Best Places to Work according to the North Bay Business Journal. The winners were selected by the editorial staff and companies were judged on diversity, family-friendly workplace, community involvement, and employee benefits.We’re honored to be recognized by the Business Journal and be among other Best Places to Work including Sonoma Technology Group, St. Francis Winery & Vineyards, Golden Living Center, Moss Adams, and Costeaux French Bakery.Want to see what it’s like to work at Glassdoor? Read company reviews from Glassdoor employees, check out our video below and look at our open jobs to see if there is a job that’s right for you.What would make your company the best place to work? Share with us belowlast_img read more

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F@#K That: How Cursing Can Help Your Career

first_imgCursing is a surefire way to discredit yourself in the workplace, or is it? We’ve all heard the advice and seen the surveys that cursing will hurt your career. But cursing can actually help it, granted you do it right.“Cursing successfully is an art,” says Richie Frieman, an etiquette expert and the Modern Manners Guy blogger. “It’s how comedians are able to do it and make a punch line rock the audience.”Cursing in the workplace is bad when it’s used as the last line of defense in an argument, used to defame a coworker or is used distastefully when telling a joke or story. A recent example of cursing gone wrong is former Yahoo CEO Carol Bartz, who was known for her colorful language. In her first public comments after being fired she called the board “doofuses” who “f***** me over.”According to career experts, Bartz use of foul language throughout her tenure at Yahoo sent the wrong message to her employees. Rather than creating a relaxed atmosphere, it created a bit of hysteria.“Yahoo was a highly charged environment and she did it in a way that magnified or spotlighted the tension and showed the tremendous pressure she was under,” says Mark Jaffe, president of Wyatt & Jaffe, the executive search firm.But if used correctly, cursing can signal it’s time to dispense with formality and that we are going to talk candidly, says Jaffe.  It also levels the playing field at least for that moment in time.“Cursing can signal that we are going to be direct and unvarnished and tell each other what we really think,” says Jaffe. “It creates a sense of democracy and equality if you do it tastefully.”Workers have to be careful when cursing to ensure it doesn’t make people uncomfortable or isn’t done in a way that makes people feel like they have to curse, too.  It can never be used as an epithet or used in a crude or vulgar manner.“Never use any words literally or in a suggestive way and never use it at someone or against a person or organization,” says Jaffe. For instance, it’s ok to say we’re going to kick their asses on the next challenge or let’s skip over the meeting which we know is 85% bullshit and get to the solutions, but it’s not ok to say those F****** at XYZ Corp.The timing of your cursing will also determine if it helps or hurts your career. If you aren’t in a position where you need to break the ice, then you don’t want to be the first one to curse, just like you wouldn’t want to be the first one to loosen your tie in a meeting. But if you are charged with breaking down some of the formality and structure, then Jaffe says it can be an effective strategy.The environment you are in will also dictate if you can curse successfully. If you work for a very staid and proper company, chances are cursing during a management meeting isn’t going to fly. But if the company is more lax, then it can be a powerful tool and rallying cry.“To use it well and use it to get ahead, you have to be in a field or company that allows it and/or approves of it,” says Frieman. “The only way to get ahead in a job is to be accepted by the people around you and if they curse and you can pull it off, that is when it will work.”The frequency in which you curse also matters. If curse words are flying out of your mouth left and right, it will quickly lose its impact. But if you use it sparingly, it can actually be an effective way to drive home the point. It can also be that last word that makes the other person back down in an argument granted you rarely curse.“It could be the driving force of a point or the saddest attempt to be an authority figure,” says Frieman. “It only works when you know the audience you are in.”last_img read more

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5 Ways To Successfully Run A Side Business

first_imgIf you’re starting a new project, or a new business, in September, you’re in good company.This is the month that moms and dads, recent grads and others decide to jump into a new endeavor or restart some project shoved aside in the summer months.They need to balance this with the demands of their day job – and the boss may or may not be supportive of your Etsy shop or your new business. Yet these slash careers or side pursuits can make you “more rounded, develop additional skips, develop additional business relationships” and more, said Donna Schilder, a career coach who has had a string of side businesses, from editing and resume writing to an e-course on creating success through LinkedIn. So as you ramp up your second income stream or an active volunteer activity, consider these five pointers:1. Ask permission or ask forgiveness. Read up on your employer’s policies about outside jobs and interests. Find out whether you are expected to notify someone in HR or elsewhere. Then consider your direct supervisor’s views – if she’s laid back and involved in many community activities, she may not sweat your tiny start-up. Then decide whether to fly below the radar for a while, or be completely upfront and tell everyone what you’re working on from the start.2. Carve out time. Use your lunch hour or time spent waiting for a doctor’s appointment or anything else on your project or business, suggests Schilder. Take the time on airplanes or on a bus, and the hours before your family gets up or after they’re in bed to move things forward. Change your commute so the time can be spent working on your side business, she suggests. And always carry your projects with you, with an iPad or notebook to make this easier.3. See synergies and share them. “Let the boss know what’s in it for him or the company,” Schilder said, such as promoting the company when you are published or do public speaking. Find ways to use the skills or research from your personal passion in your day job.4. Make the boss look good.  It’s hard to argue with success, so make sure your work is a stellar success for your supervisor and your company. Exceed your numbers and offer suggestions that allow your boss and your department to shine.  “Ensure you always meet your bosses’ deadlines,” she said.5. Know when to say no.  If a client wants you to cater a big event during the busiest week at your day job, decline the job. Avoid clients that require 24-hours-a-day attention and turn down work that conflicts with your main career. Sometimes you also may need to decline – politely, professionally – extra assignments or a promotion at your day job too, especially if they require more hours or relocation. You always must work the hours you’re employed for, Schilder says, yet some people negotiate for a reduced work schedule or sabbatical so they can build their business. “If you don’t ask, it won’t happen,” she says.The key, of course, is creating a win-win situation so that as you grow your own project or business, your employer also is winning. Or as I used to say to colleagues who published books or started enterprises while working for major newspapers, “I bask in your reflected glory.”last_img read more

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5 Signs You’re Ready To Start Your Own Business

first_imgThe tough job market has forced many people to consider starting their own business. But necessity doesn’t guarantee success. Often, success depends on the reasons you decided to start the business to begin with.“A lot of times I hear somebody talking about starting a business because they hate their job or hate their boss,” says Gary Shouldis, a small business consultant and coach. “That’s not a reason to start a business. Maybe they need to find a new career or a new company.”Before you trade in your time card for an expense account, consider these five signs you’re ready to go out on your own:1. You’ve been pondering it for sometimeStarting your own business isn’t an idea that pops in your head one day and the next day you’re marching into your boss’ office to quit your job. For many successful business owners, it’s an idea they’ve considered perhaps for many years. “It’s something they’ve been thinking about for a long time. They’ve explored other avenues, tried to do the career, but felt like for their own personal growth they needed to pursue their own business,” says Shouldis.2. You can do it betterFor some people, the light bulb to start their own business goes off by watching the mistakes of their own boss. Maybe their current employer doesn’t execute correctly or the company mistreats its customers or clients. Whatever the reason, the impetus for many small business owners was the realization they would do it differently, says Jeanne Yocum, founder of the blog Succeeding in Small Business. “If you are questioning the decisions on a routine basis, you may want to go out and see if your way is better,” says Yocum.3. It doesn’t come from a place of unhappinessIf you think starting your own business is going to bring you happiness because you’ll be your own boss or can set your own hours, think again. According to Shouldis, the people who struggle the most when they go out on their own are the ones who do it because they hate their job. “You’ll never work harder than for yourself,” says Shouldis. “You are going to make demands on yourself and your business that you never experienced.”According to Shouldis, the people who are successful are the ones that don’t hate their career, but rather have a different calling. They aren’t doing it for money or for more free time, they are doing it out of passion.They also aren’t shackled by a paycheck. “If you start to see your pay check as a ball and chain rather than a benefit, that’s a real sign,” says Yocum.4. You have the expertise and confidence In order to be a successful business owner, you have to know what you are doing and do it well. That’s why career experts say before you go out on your own, make sure you have the expertise and experience to run your own business. If you do have that, you’ll be confident in your dealings with customers and business associates, which is key to running a successful business.  “You have to feel confident you can do it,” says Yocum.  “It comes at different times for different people.”5. You have a desire to keep on learningIn a career, chances are you’ll spend your time doing one thing really well. When you own your own business you wear many hats whether its receptionist, sales associate, book keeper or IT manager, which is why you have to possess a desire to learn. If you are the type of person that is always looking to better yourself and wants to learn new things then chances are you’ll do well as a business owner.“You always have to branch out and grow,” says Shouldis. “As a small business owner, you don’t have a marketing department, a finance department or a janitorial department. The ones that do it well are always interested in learning new things and are always trying to better themselves.”last_img read more

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5 Secrets Revealed To Land Your Next Job

first_imgBe Willing to Accept Smaller Roles. Many successful people have had to take bit parts just to keep the bills paid while waiting for another starring role. These smaller parts also help to keep hard-earned skills honed. Don’t allow pride to get in the way of keeping your career afloat while you maintain a weather eye on the horizon. Have you ever watched a particular performance and then wondered how that person became so popular? After all, you may have thought, there is nothing exceptionally astonishing about the way they sing, dance, act, play a musical instrument or tell a joke. You know for a fact that there are likely thousands of individuals who could perform at least at the level of what you are witnessing, yet none of them have achieved even a smattering of the acclaim this person has.One word can typically sum up the reasons for this: marketing!If you want to be a star, you must create buzz. This is true whether your sights are on Carnegie Hall or the next job opportunity in your chosen career. Following are five great ways to market yourself in the workforce to help you become the “next big thing:”Generate Buzz Through a Storyboard Resume. Is your resume a blockbuster film that will have all of the critics talking, or a straight-to-video documentary? If it’s the latter, and you’re not sure how to make more of it than you have, consider partnering with a professional “agent” that may be able to tell your story better than you can. Tune into the adage about “tooting your own horn” to be reminded of the importance of having someone speak for you. With very few exceptions, most entertainment personalities must rely heavily on those they hired to get the word out, regardless of their talent. Why should your career search be any different? Stay in Touch. Let those you’ve worked for in the past know you’re ready for the next role. They may not personally have anything available, but the chances are, they know someone in the industry who does. Channeling these past successful relationships for your future success is a sure-fire way to keep your name on the “A” list. Hang Out With the Stars. To be recognized, you have to be seen. Be on the lookout for events and gatherings that attract those you want to be seen by, and then be there as well. Being a part of local events, charities and professional associations is a great way to make contacts that otherwise may never have been made. If you’re currently employed, seek out projects with star performers and influencers and then jump in, feet first to become a key contributor–show them your value. Be Searchable. The Internet is making overnight stars out of everyone from newborns to pets. Get in on the action by making certain that whatever you bring to the table can quickly be found. There are a host of outlets available to the job seeker, so find the one that works best for you, and prepare to dazzle your intended audience.Following these few simple tricks of the marketing trade is sure to increase your “star power” and leave your audience in awe.last_img read more

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6 Tips To Make Your References Work For You

first_imgYou are that close to landing the job of your dreams. All your future boss has to do is check your references and you’ll be on the team.Yet reference checking can be a formidable hurdle, one that may eliminate one in five candidates from consideration, according to an OfficeTeam survey.  My new Fortune magazine article shows the speed bumps in the way of exceptional due diligence, and gives bosses some advice on digging deeper.For you, the job seeker who wants to jump this barrier easily, you need a clear understanding of this process. You will need to anticipate and coordinate with your references.Here are six ways to manage your references so they check out and usher you in:1. Ask for more.  When Gerald Maatman, a partner in Seyfarth Shaw law firm, hires an associate, he asks for six to ten references – and either he or his HR person will talk to them all. “I want to see the wide range of people’s assessment on the candidate,” he told me. Some companies pursue “360-degree reference checks;” people who reported to you, as well as your supervisors. So prepare a long references list; include a handful from your volunteer activities, especially if you’ve developed crucial skills or connections there. If your list is light, put out a request on Facebook or your LinkedIn profile and see who raises their virtual hand.2. Check your references.  Research the people who are recommending you to make sure they have a good reputation. You wouldn’t want to list someone who was in legal trouble or had just been fired for workplace misconduct. Assure yourself – and the HR manager – that your reference is not saying or doing anything online that “could put you at a disadvantage,” Paula Hunter, executive director at Outercurve Foundation told MarketWatch.  If you’re using a relative, say your father or aunt, make the personal relationship clear and are truthful, with a balanced picture of your work performance.3. Prep them. After your first interview, spend 10 minutes briefing your most important references on the job – including key traits you have are most valuable to your future employer. It’s been a while since you worked together, fill them in on some recent successes or projects you’ve completed. Discuss any stumbles or big mistakes you made while working together. That way, when the HR manager asks your reference about weaknesses or missteps, your reference will recall the comeback or solution and not just the problem you triggered. Help frame the incident in a way that shows something positive, or a lesson learned that paid off later.4. Anticipate questions.  Smart recruiters and HR people will ask the same questions of the candidate and their references, especially on anything tricky or controversial. They may ask “why’d you leave this company?” Or “Tell me about a time you dropped the ball.” So after your interview, drop your references an email on the tougher questions they’re also likely to hear – and remind them of details that may have eluded them. You want your stories to match up, as long as the reference will do that without feeling uncomfortable or like they’re lying.5. Watch nuance and tone.  If your former boss sounds upbeat and pleased, your chances of getting the job could increase. “A favorable reference is not hesitant to jump in and sing the praises,” said Jeff Shane, executive vice president of Allison & Taylor which conducts reference checks for individuals seeking jobs and businesses. If they hesitate or pause before answering, it could indicate a “concern below the surface,” he said. So if your former boss is cautious, thoughtful and slow to answer questions, you may want to find another reference who immediately will sound enthusiastic about you. Or perhaps your former boss could answer reference questions via email.6. Displacing the displeased boss.  About half of all reference checks turn up something negative, Shane said. Your job is to make sure the enthusiastic and impressed-with-you types far outweigh anyone who may express reservations or disappointment. If your former supervisor reprimanded you several times, you may want to bring that up in the interview – and show how you learned to ask for help when you had too many assignments due the same week. If you tell the story first to the hiring manager, you may be able to remove most of the negativity it carries. Or if you could come up with two other supervisors to put on your reference list and they sing your praises, your employer may never get to the grumpy former boss.last_img read more

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WEBINAR: 3 Great Reasons To Examine Your Employer Brand

first_imgPushing your employer brand out across social channels can be a daunting task. How do you make sure your message is being heard among job seekers? Are potential candidates picking up on what makes your company unique? How do you know if it’s working?Join us for a free webinar to help get you on the right track by learning how to best examine your employer brand in order to attract the candidates you want.When:  Wednesday, December 5 at 1:00 pm ETWho: Linda Brenner, managing director, Designs on TalentCarmen Hudson, engagement manager, sourcing and social media, Recruiting ToolboxPaige Vesuvio, VP marketing, GlassdoorWill share their experience and advice on how you can make the most of your employer brand across a variety of social media platforms like Facebook, Twitter and Glassdoor to help you recruit top talent.REGISTER  – at no cost to you, courtesy of Glassdoorlast_img read more

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10 Tips To Survive A New Boss

first_imgIt has been said there is but one constant, and that is change. Some live for it, while others fight it tooth and nail. Change can be at once exciting and frightening. Amazing how often those two words interconnect, isn’t it?When that change involves a new supervisor, don’t fret. If you stay on the same job long enough, eventually you will experience this transition. Here are a few simple suggestions for those who embrace it and those not as likely to.1. Be welcoming. Whether they are brand new to the company or were recently promoted from your own peer group, treat them as you would hope to be treated. Remember, this is a change for them as well, so put yourself in their shoes and help things get off on the right foot.2. Be open-minded. They may do things a little different from what you’re used to, but someone decided they were what your department needed. Don’t be too quick to judge or criticize their managerial style. Given a chance they may delight you with the changes they make.3. Don’t draw comparisons. Your new manager is not your old manager. Drawing unfair or unflattering comparisons between the two does little to smooth the transition. It does, however, prove a certain immaturity that most likely won’t be tolerated for long.4. Lend a hand. Your office systems may be alien to them. Be willing to pitch in when needed. Being the “go-to” person for your new boss isn’t a bad thing.5. Give them space. It may take a day or two for them to get comfortable with their new environment. Be available to answer questions, but keep your distance. The last thing any new manager needs is someone breathing down their necks asking a million personal questions or basically just being a pest. Don’t be ‘that’ guy or girl.6. Don’t take advantage. This person is not your substitute teacher from high school. They are a highly trained professional charged with running your department. You might get away with two-hour lunches and coming in late for a day or two, but it will catch up to you and the fallout may be much worse than a trip to the principal’s office.7. Save the flattery. Constantly fawning over your new boss will get you plenty of attention. However, most of it will be negative. Gain favor by being a solid team member, not by trying to win a popularity contest.8. Be like the father of our country. Lying about your duties and skills will eventually be brought to light. Your new manager most likely has been prepped with information about their department so attempting to give yourself a lighter work schedule or more responsibilities in an attempt to impress them will backfire worse than a worn-out musket.9. Don’t quit. A managerial change may cause you a certain amount of angst, but try to keep your emotions in check. Even a good change can seem painful at first. Give it time before making a decision you can’t reverse.10. Don’t be resentful. If you feel you were qualified for this position and were passed over, showing your resentment will be the fastest way to be shown the door. The choice has been made, and if you value your current position, respect that decision. Your bad attitude won’t change anything except what people think of YOU.Coming to grips with a change that affects your work environment can be one of the most trying times of your adult life. How you deal with it is up to you.last_img read more

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6 Things Hiring Managers Don’t Want In A Candidate

first_imgYou’re a qualified candidate, and the job market is tough. But there could still be plenty of reasons you’re getting passed over for every position you apply or interview for. A recent Glassdoor post reported that only 17 percent of hiring managers say job seekers have the skills they’re actually looking for to fill their open positions.Among the qualities hiring managers want in a candidate are a global business perspective, social media savvy, and a wide-range of skills. But is it possible that you have some qualities that turn hiring managers off, despite your best traits and abilities? Definitely. To avoid being skipped over for a job, check out these traits hiring managers don’t want to see in a candidate:1. Lack of energy. If you’re not clearly energetic and enthusiastic about the company or position, it will show in the interview. Having enthusiasm shows you’re driven and have a desire to be active at all times, which is a quality that inherently makes you a good worker. No one wants to hire a passive candidate who complains or can’t keep a good attitude, even when given the more mundane tasks. Remember, your energy level will show the second you walk in the door, so commit to being enthusiastic from the get-go.2. Inability to use free time. Hiring managers don’t want to see a candidate who has no additional interests or personality beyond what’s required to get a job in their industry. You need to show you’re a human being, not a robot. Hiring managers love to see candidates with hobbies, or even those who have taken on a second job—it shows you’re able to make good use of your free time to expand your skills and interests, and this is a quality that’s likely to spill over into your professional life. 3. Procrastination. Recruiters want to be sure they’re hiring someone who’s punctual, and they’ll shy away from anyone who doesn’t demonstrate a clear ability to see things through to completion. Provide examples of times when you’ve wrapped up a big project, like writing an article or completing a design portfolio. Show that you’re someone who spends your time well, and hiring managers will pick up on this as an indication that you’d put the same dedication into their company.4. Unpreparedness. If you show up at the interview without having a working knowledge of the company, what its mission is, what type of work it does, who its clients are, etc., do not think it won’t show! Hiring managers will be able to tell from the get-go if you haven’t done your homework and fully researched the company. Come armed with a few additional questions to ask at the end of the interview to show you’re already engaged in the company’s mission.5. Job hopping. If you’ve had tons of different positions in the last two years, or tend to leave a company after less than six months, this could signal you’re flaky, difficult to work with, or at the very least, unsure of what it is you really want to do. That doesn’t mean you need to lie on your resume – simply be honest with the hiring manager about what exactly has caused you to switch companies so many times. Reassure them that although you may have taken a while to figure out exactly what type of position or company culture you’re looking for; there are still multiple instances in which you’ve demonstrated you’re dependable, then provide concrete examples.6. Shaky online presence. Thirty-seven percent of hiring managers check candidates’ social media sites these days, and the number is only growing. If you lack a solid online presence, this could show you don’t pay attention to detail, aren’t truly engaged in your industry, or at the very least, don’t care about how others perceive you. Make sure you’ve got some sort of presence online, and that it’s a positive one. Start a professional Twitter account or blog, and look into the specifics of how to brand yourself. The last thing you want is for your Google search results to stop your job search short.There are tons of different qualities hiring managers may be looking for in their candidates, and these can vary heavily depending on the nature of the open position. But no hiring manager likes to see the qualities listed above. Eliminate these negative attributes before you dive into an application or interview, and it could mean the difference between remaining unemployed or finally landing that open position. Good luck!last_img read more

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How To Avoid A Layoff

first_imgNobody wants to end up on the layoff list, but unfortunately workforce reductions are all too common in this economy. Whether your company has announced layoffs or rumors are swirling of impending ones, there are ways you can reduce your chances of landing on the list or at least cushion the blow if you do get let go.One of the most common reactions to the prospects of layoffs is to panic but doing that can be counter-productive. Often layoff numbers aren’t set in stone, which means the timing and size can change at a moment’s notice. Instead of panicking or gossiping about what may or may not happen use the time to shine at your job and at the same time come up with a plan B.“When a company announces an upcoming reduction with no timetable attached, it is likely that the names have not been put on paper,” says Julie Bauke, career strategist, president of The Bauke Group, and author of Stop Peeing on our Shoes: Avoiding the 7 Mistakes that Screw Up your Job Search. “If you are one of those people who get caught up in or fuel the rumor mill, it will not go unnoticed.”Since employers typically use layoffs to let go of the least productive in their company, career experts say when layoffs are pending, you need to show you are valuable to the organization. According to Susan Ruhl, a managing partner at OI Partners – Innovative Career Consulting in Denver, there are simple things you can do including going above and beyond, showing you are a team player, being on time and dependable and doing things that will get you recognition and set you apart from your colleagues.“Go well above the minimum requirements and seek to make yourself indispensable,” says Ruhl. “Demonstrate how motivated you are and gain a reputation as someone who consistently delivers more than expected.”You’ll also need to be your own advocate, which means letting your boss and any other superiors in the company know just how valuable you are. If you hear rumors about layoffs, Joel Garfinkle, author of Getting Ahead: Three Steps to Take Your Career to the Next Level, says to ask your boss about it and use that conversation as an opportunity to make it known why you are valuable to the company. You want to plant a seed so come layoff time your boss has your contributions in the back of his or her mind.Garfinkle says to also try to get on the hottest project in the company, the one that everyone is realizing is the future of the business. “Your employability will be greater because you are working on something that’s seen within the company as important,” says Garfinkle.During the time the layoffs are announced and they happen, it’s important to accept that you may be one of those on the chopping block and plan accordingly. It’s a good idea to gather all your key information including a list of contacts and anything that documents your accomplishments within the organization, says Bauke. “Two-thirds or more of people get their next job through a person they know or one they meet in the job search; you will be slowed down significantly if you have to recreate your contact list,” she says.You’ll also have to take an honest assessment of your skills, interests and experience, says Bauke. You want to know realistically how marketable you are, what the demand is for your skills and experience and if you have kept up to date in your field. She says to start connecting with professional associations, read trade journals and network with people who do what you do.It’s understandable that you will want to find a job right away, but hold off until you can think clearly and can make an honest assessment of what you want out of your career. “Many people are too upset and emotional during this time to quickly launch a search,” says Ruhl. “Give yourself some time to re-assess your career and determine what you want to do next.”last_img read more

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10 Signs It’s Time To Break Up With Your Job

first_imgIs your current job leaving you feeling blue?Even the best jobs have the chance to turn into something you no longer yearn for. Some say all good things must come to an end, but in the case of a bad job, it’s best not to put off your departure.In spite of the economy, there are plenty of fish in the sea or, rather, other jobs available that make you happy. (Yes, even in this economy.) While everyone has a bad day at work, it’s important to understand the glaring signs guiding you in the direction of a new job.Here are 10 signs a job break-up might be the next step in your career:1. The company is in decline. It’s time to get out now while the ship is still afloat. Times are tough for many companies, and it’s crucial you’re aware of what’s going on at your company. If your current employer is experiencing a downward spiral, it may be time to exit swiftly.2. You’re bored. If you’re no longer challenged at work, it’s likely your work is suffering. This might be a great time to break up with your current position and move onto something new, perhaps even within the same company. Consider having a professional, solution-driven conversation with your manager to get to the bottom of this situation.3. Learning has ceased. Professional development is crucial throughout your career. If your work has stopped teaching you something new, it might be time to move on. Professional development is a beneficial aspect of career success and should be taken into consideration when seeking out a new position.4. Your health is declining. Experiencing large amounts of stress, anxiety, and fear can have long-term effects on your health and bad jobs generally provide all of those. Whether physical or mental, deteriorating health isn’t something anyone should face due to their job.5. You’ve found something new. Sometimes new employment opportunities can appear out of nowhere. While the grass certainly isn’t always greener at a new company, this is the best case scenario when it comes to leaving a position.6. You’re having nightmares about your workplace. On-the-job dreams tend to happen to those individuals invested in their work, but it’s the recurring nightmares you should take into consideration.7. Your gut says “go.” Trusting yourself is essential to successfully leaving a bad employment situation. If you truly believe you’d be happier at another company or in another position, it’s time to move on.8. You and your company don’t share the same core values. Matching your values to your company’s values is a necessity when it comes to long-term employment. If your current employer doesn’t share the same visions or values as you, it might be time to seek out someone who does.9. You’ve lost sight of your career goals. Big or small, the goals you set for your career are important. It’s easy to find yourself working at a job for longer than you’ve expected and completely veering away from your original goals. Take some time to reassess and seek out positions that will set you back on track.10. You’re being mistreated. No one should have to deal with workplace bullying, sexual harassment, or any other kind of reprehensible behavior. Assess your current situation and be sure to share what has been happening to you with human resources. Never be afraid to leave a position in which you are experiencing mistreatment.Reaching your career goals often means making crucial decisions about your happiness in regard to your current position. Use these signs to help you understand if a new job is in your future.last_img read more

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Are Employers Responsible For Stopping Office Affairs?

first_imgBack in the days of the Palm Pilot, it was affixed to me just like my cell phone. Living without it to manage my calendar and my life was a big, big issue. I have what I refer to as a “control problem” when it comes to my time. I’m casual on the surface but organized when it comes to meetings, events, and work relationships in my life.It was a warm fall evening and I became panic stricken when I realized that I left my Palm at the office. With sweaty palms and an elevated heart rate, I raced back to the office to find an employee and my boss in the throws of passion on the office floor. Gross. It was forever burned into my mind and I couldn’t look away. Someone else had an elevated heart rate but for different reasons than I.Eww. How does one manage the awkwardness of relationships and romance at work?Given that many employees work 12 to 14 hour days, it’s no surprise that feelings and attraction develop between co-workers. In fact, according to a Glassdoor survey, 37% of employees report they have been involved with a co-worker romantically and a surprising 12%admit to making love while at work. Shared interests and passions create chemistry, and long work nights create opportunities to get a bit cozier than what might feel appropriate during the day.Open floor plans and the presence of security cameras are making it harder for employees to commit the cardinal sin, but do employers have a responsibility beyond this to prevent office affairs? While you can’t control attraction, there are some proactive measures you can take to keep the workplace “PG.”Sometimes, it’s better to compromiseCreate a policy that looks out for the interests of your workplace as a whole and your employees. While an across-the-board ban on relationships may seem like the simpler thing, it could also prevent employees from meeting someone with whom they are truly compatible. Rather than simply having a no-tolerance policy concerning interpersonal relationships between employees, consider requesting that they report them to human resources. The fewer secrets, the better off your workplace will be. Employees will be less likely to sneak around and engage in “extra curricular activities” when they know their relationship is on the books, so to speak.Communication is keyDespite the fact that most employers do have some kind of policy in place, 41%of workers say they’re unsure whether their employer has a policy regarding office romances and 28% believe their current or most recent employer does not have this kind of policy. Make sure employees are aware of any policies you have and that they feel comfortable addressing the issue with you.A good friend of mine worked at a technology company that focused on healthcare that catered to young, hungry, and fiercely competitive workforce. Their motto was the more you were in the office, the more you work, and thus, the more productive you really are. Senior leaders encouraged office relationships, romances, flings, and dating with people from work. Because if you were in the office, you were likely to get more work done than skipping out early to take your sweetie out on the town.  Company mixers and social hours were designed to encourage personal connections and dating with colleagues.Loose lips sink shipsThe balancing act between maintaining a policy like this and prying into employees’ personal lives can be difficult, but the key to its success is respect. Just as other employee issues, such as medical leave or disciplinary action, wouldn’t be discussed with others, relationships shouldn’t be either. Sex and love are far more gossip-worthy than most HR issues, so trust and respect will be a vital part of employees buying into your policy.last_img read more

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UPDATE: How To Use Glassdoor In Your Job Search – Mobile Edition

first_imgUpdate: The Glassdoor Android app is now available to download for free from Google Play.Do you feel like you spend as much time, if not more, on your smartphone as you do a computer when it comes to your career? If you answered yes, you’re not alone. Mashable recently reported that 26% of job seekers use their mobile devices for career-related purposes and another 59% could imagine doing so.Whether you’re already comfortable using your phone for work or are interested in learning new ways it can help in your career, Glassdoor offers the following mobile ready resources that can come in handy during your job search.Stay Current On Open Jobs. Want to stay on top of new jobs where you live?  No matter where you are, search millions of job listings on Glassdoor by job title, employer and location. This can help you maintain momentum during your job search process. Beyond seeing the open position, you will also see the rating employees have given the companies who are hiring. Plus, many job listings allow you to apply directly from your phone. If the only computer you have access to is a employer-owned computer, then applying for a job through your phone can help keep your job search discreet.Glassdoor job search also allows you to share jobs with friends and family or email them to yourself to easily keep track of jobs you’re interested in.Download the free Glassdoor iPhone app, Android app or visit Glassdoor from your web browser.Research Your Earning Potential. Need to negotiate on the fly or curious what your earning potential might be in a particular job? Find salary information for specific job titles at more than 250,000 companies worldwide. Imagine you are sitting in an interview while the employer has stepped away for a few minutes. You can quickly pull up your phone and see what the company pays for the position you’re interviewing for plus what their competitors would pay – the more information you have, the better prepared you are to negotiate.Get Employee Perspective On Companies Hiring. Check out Glassdoor’s company reviews and ratings to find out what employees really think about their job and employer. You’ll get their opinion on the work environment, compensation, benefits, perks, culture and more well before you apply or accept a job offer.About Glassdoor Mobile: When you tap into Glassdoor from your phone, you get the scoop on salary and compensation packages as well as company reviews direct from employees. Best of all, the information is job title- and company-specific so no more guessing about what a company pays or what its work environment is like. And to top it all off, you also get the latest job listings that can easily be shared with your network. Download Glassdoor’s iPhone app for free from the App Store, Android app for free from Google Play, or visit Glassdoor from your mobile web browser.How have you tried the Glassdoor mobile experience? Tell us what you think.last_img read more

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How To Have A More Meaningful Career

first_imgAs the workforce evolves and more people are taking control over their careers, many are willing to sacrifice a higher salary in order to find a career with meaning.Finding a career with meaning is an important aspect of every person’s career path. Whether you choose a job where you can help people or one that allows you to find deeper meaning in your work, every person has an idea of how they want their career to provide meaning in their life.When looking for a career with meaning, ask yourself the following questions to help you discover the right path to take:What purpose do I want my career to have? First, think about what your career means to you. Do you want a career that provides opportunities for you to be promoted, or do you prefer to have one that fulfills your passions? Finding a career with meaning is about following a path which gives you satisfaction and promotes the values you believe in.How do I want to make a difference? When choosing a career path, think about how you want your work to contribute to your community and touch the lives of others. By aligning your career path with how you want to make a difference in your community, you will discover how you can make a difference to your team, upper management, and the people impacted by the work you do. If you decide that a meaningful career for you is making a difference in the world, it will help shape your career and guide you to happiness and career satisfaction.What do I find rewarding in a career? It’s important to create a list of your needs and goals you want to achieve in your career. Think about what makes you feel accomplished throughout your work. Do you feel rewarded when you receive a promotion or when you know you made a positive impact in your company? By creating a list of what is rewarding to you, it will be easier to find a career filled with what you value and satisfaction.How do I want my career to contribute to my future? Many people have a different idea of what their career means to them. Whether they have a career so they can support their families or they choose a path to serve others, it’s important to look into the next five years of your life and think about where you’d like to be. If you decide to choose a career that allows you to climb to the ladder or one that allows you to touch the lives of others, think about how you want it to impact your future.Searching for a meaningful career can be a challenge for many people. Sometimes it’s because they can’t figure out what would provide satisfaction for them in their career. When you look for a meaningful career, look for something to help you reach your goals and find value in your work every day. Remember, your career path is unique to you; therefore, you are in control of how your career will provide meaning for you.last_img read more

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Why Workplace Etiquette Matters

first_imgOur 24/7 instant-access virtual world has taken the “person” out of “personal,” especially in the workplace. Until we all turn into robots with hard drives, I suggest we take a breath and slow down long enough to remember that we are all living, breathing people with feelings who get passionate, tired, burned out, excited, worried, and overwhelmed.That is why it matters when someone calls us on the phone – one-on-one – to say, “Carol, I was thinking about you. What’s going on?” It doesn’t get any more personal than hearing your own name by someone who genuinely cares.Human beings have a driving need to feel important and special, and yet, despite all the public electronic chatter that purports to be personal, it is very easy to feel faceless and like a number. We yearn for connection. The danger is that the same devices that are seeking to connect us can also separate us.Take a look around at any restaurant to see how many people are engaging with their devices and not the people at the table. Or how about when you are at a party and the person you are speaking with is looking over your shoulder to see who else is at the event? Or feel the difference between someone who periodically checks his phone during a meeting versus the same person who intentionally powers it down in order to give her undivided attention.Keeping it personal and practicing good workplace etiquette is respectful and gets noticed. Here are 10 ways to make people a priority in the workplace, which translates into success, loyalty, and trust.Make an unexpected phone call.Leave a sincere message if you get the person’s voicemail.Send a hand-written thank you note.Choose a small but thoughtful gift based on a conversation. (Favorite flower, cookie, candy, music, etc.)Remember birthdays. Bonus touch: Homemade cupcakes.Intentionally power down your phone for a meeting (and watch the reaction).Have tech-free meals and offer undivided attention.Follow-up with someone who you know had a bad day yesterday.Remember names of people who are important to your employer, colleague, client, etc.Be an undistracted listener.True story: Heather could have sent an email to her colleague but chose to pick up the phone instead. They chatted about weekend plans and then Heather clarified the business reason for her call, which had to do with scheduling a hard-to-book meeting between their executives. The call resulted in an easy exchange and lasted five minutes. Even though it would have been shorter to write and send an email, Heather knows that it was totally worth it to make the call. Why?These kinds of calls, made selectively, build and strengthen relationships and “emotional capital.” Heather knows that she and her colleague need to depend on one another and it helps if they “like” each other. In our virtual world, email can be toneless and impersonal and in certain situations, not the most effective form of communication.An hour after that phone conversation, Heather received an email from her colleague who thanked her for the call. Heather knows the power of the “personal touch.” The unspoken message is: You made time for me. I feel special. Special feels good, doesn’t it?This is precisely why Starbucks is so popular. Your name gets written on a cup and spoken out loud at least twice. And your beverage is made to your exact specifications and if it is not up to your standards, the drink gets made again. That’s personal.Making it personal with the people in your world will make you stand out and will help you to succeed.  The personal touch will be valued, appreciated, and rewarded.last_img read more

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Why Government Workers Stay In Their Jobs Longer

first_imgWhen it comes to retention, the government has something over the private sector: loyalty. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, employees for government agencies typically stay in their job for an average of 7.8 years, compared to 4.6 years for non-government jobs.What’s more, data from Aon Hewitt, the human resources and consulting company, shows government employees are both passively and actively looking for a new job at a slower rate than in the private sector.So, what’s making government workers happier than their non-government brethren? According to career experts it’s both mission and compensation. “The government is mission-centric so they attract a certain type of employee,” says Ken Oehler, Aon Hewitt’s global engagement practice leader. “People attracted to government agencies are people who are service-orientated and have a strong affiliation to what they do.”Not every government worker is in love with their job, but for many, especially more senior level employees, they have a special skill, interest or desire that makes them want to stay in their position. Career experts liken it to non-profits or charities that are also able to retain staff for longer because the people working for them believe in the cause.In addition to aligning with the cause or mission, government workers may not get rich but they do know job security is higher than in the private sector and that their benefits will be richer.  During the recession, companies were going out of business left and right but one place that was still spending was the government. Sure, some agencies were reducing headcount but government workers fared much better than their private worker counterparts. “Typically government jobs are more insulated from economic conditions, employment ‘at will’ and follow a lock-step progressive disciplinary policy prior to termination,” says Laura Kerekes, chief knowledge officer for Think HR. “Unions and/or employee groups within the government sector may make it more difficult (or slower) to terminate employment based on job performance. “According to Oehler people are attracted and stay in government jobs because they know their employer will take care of them over the long haul, which creates reciprocal loyalty to the organization. In general industry, companies can’t afford to promise they’ll take care of their workers for a decade, let alone forever, which leads to less loyalty and higher turnover. “The government still has a lot of rich benefits like pension plans and healthcare that is a bit richer than in a typical private company,” says Oehler, noting that in general industry jobs, employers are embracing consumer driven healthcare and distancing themselves from defined benefit pension plans all at the expense to the employee.So how can companies get their employees to stay longer without losing their shirts in the process? According to experts, whereas the No. 1 retention tool in the government is around benefits, at private industry it’s all about career development and training. “You have to provide workers with things that matter to them like improving skills and employability,” says Oehler, noting that compensation, recognition and career opportunities are also key reasons to stay. “Things like that aren’t necessarily about tying you down to the job but they motivate you to perform above and beyond in your job.”Although it may seem obvious, making the right hiring decision will also go a long way in keeping employees with the company longer. According to Kerekes, companies have to make the effort upfront to hire carefully and make sure the right people are getting the right jobs. Once the employees are there, they need to be brought on board in a way that continues to reinforce to the employee that he or she made the right decision by coming to work there. “Great onboarding and initial training can help the employee to be more effective more quickly in the job and less likely to leave early on in the employment relationship,” she says, noting management has to be trained so that they can quickly identify any employee dissatisfaction within his or her staff. “Generally government work is not known as a place to get rich,” adds Oehler. “But the deal is come here and we will take care of you.”last_img read more

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5 Ways To Make Your Employer Feel Like A Celebrity

first_imgHave you ever wondered how the assistants to celebrities keep their über-famous employers happy, calm, and on time considering that the word “no” is rarely in their vocabulary? If the answer is “yes,” allow me to pull back the curtain on a few trade secrets that will make your employer feel like a million dollars. As the former personal assistant to Oscar winner Olympia Dukakis for 25 years, here are five of my favorite tricks of the trade.1. Make it – and keep it – personal.  A customized and personalized approach is key.  No two employers are the same so take the time to discover his pet peeves, her guilty pleasures, his hot buttons, and their comfort foods…and then act (and research) accordingly. Don’t take it personally when you think you have it down and then the preference changes. Go with it. Sometimes caring about the difference between milk chocolate and dark and aisle seat or window will be the seemingly minute magical details that matter most. Imagine yourself as a tennis player on the balls of your feet, always ready to move in the direction of the ball and you will do so with great speed, precision, and a big, beautiful smile on your face.2. Be a gatekeeper extraordinaire.  Become crystal clear about who gets in and who does not. Create an “Interrupt List” so that you know exactly who is on the A, B, and C list. When in doubt, ask your employer. Still in doubt? Ask again. Your employer will be impressed by your insistence that his time and energy is protected as you move through the controlled chaos of your day to day work together.3. Respect the preferred methods of communication. Is he a texter or does she love the phone? Should you never call before 9:00 a.m. or does she prefer an email containing time-sensitive information? A superstar assistant delivers information in the way her employer wants to see it when she wants to see it. And of course, the information is dead-on accurate, to the point, and easy to read and understand.4. Open eyes and ears. If a business associate asks you what to buy for your employer for his birthday or Christmas, you’ll be ready with ideas that will truly delight your employer rather than cause her to roll her eyes with annoyance. Keep detailed notes of new hobbies (taking cooking lessons), interests (vegan restaurants,) passions (pink roses, gluten-free pastas) and latest developments (she used to be a chocoholic but now she is more weight conscious after the baby.)5. Be a rock star with information. Being proactive about the things that matter to your employer will mean you will be invaluable, irreplaceable and never unemployed.Examples:You read an article about your industry that contains a key piece of information about an important client. You cut it out and put it on his desk with a sticky note that says, “I thought you would want to see this.” You’ve highlighted the client’s name.As your employer is getting ready for an event, remind her that Bill’s wife’s name is pronounced an unusual way, Betty is recently divorced so don’t ask her about him, Carol is now a blonde, and that Seth’s son just got accepted at Harvard and it would be great to congratulate him.Bonus Action: Give your employer a cheat sheet that has photos of the important people she is about to see along with the pertinent facts for her to know. Go over it with her the day before or the day of the event, if possible. People hold information better when the written word is combined with the spoken word in a conversation.Close attention to personalized details can make the difference between a great assistant and one whose employer cannot live without her. Today’s demanding job market is tough. If you want to stand out and make your employer feel like a star in the process, then seek to go above and beyond the call to exceed expectations not just on some days, but every day.last_img read more

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How To Get Your Foot In The Door

first_imgDo you know how companies find people that they hire? If you said, job boards, a company’s career site and career fairs, you would be correct. However, a better question to ask might be, what are the most popular ways companies find hires? A recent survey from CareerXRoads details the top methods and guess what was number one? Employee referrals!The No. 1 stat alone justifies the adage, “It’s not what you know; it’s who you know.” Such being the case, when you are networking for new opportunities, be as strategic as possible. Instead of throwing your resume against the proverbial wall and hoping it sticks, do some research and create a list of companies that you would love to work for. If you are focused on a certain industry, then finding similar companies is relatively easy. Google has a “related search” command that lets you find companies that are similar to a company you are focused on. For example, if I wanted to see what companies were similar to the telecom company Sprint, I would do a related search command (as shown below) and take note of the companies in the search results. In this case: AT&T, MetroPCS, Verizon Wireless and others.Once you have your company list together, check your network to see who you know who works there. You can quickly and easily accomplish this in a couple of ways: 1) Import your email address book to LinkedIn then, search LinkedIn to see who is where;  2) use Facebook’s Friend Browser and do an employer search; 3) use Glassdoor’s Inside Connections to leverage your Facebook network to find an ‘in’ at specific companies you’d like to work. You will find people who presently or formerly worked for whatever company you are focused on.Now that you have a list of companies and (hopefully) a list of people in your network who work there, I suggest that you do not contact them yet. Instead, do more research and see what their employer offers in terms of employee referrals. More often than not, there is a cash incentive for employee referrals. For example, depending on the position, Apple employee referral bonus is between $500.00 and $3,000.00. In some cases, they have been rumored to pay more.At this point, you are ready to engage your contact with a short email that spells out your aim and incentivizes them to work towards your goal. Here is a sample email that does just that:Paul,(A) Long time since Disney! I hope you and your family are well.(B) Can I offer you some free money? How does $500 sound? Your company offers $500 for referring new employees. (C) As luck would have it, I’m a perfect fit for the Human Resources generalist your company is advertising on its career page. I have 10 years of experience in HR, 4+ years experience with benefits and compensation and I have created multiple employee handbooks throughout my career.(D) Why not do us both a favor and refer me over to whomever is recruiting for this role? If I get hired, great! If not, you have lost nothing and gained a favor from me. (Smile)  (E) Below is a quick note to make it easy all around.Let me know your thoughts.John Doe…Recruiter,Please consider my referral for the HR Generalist role.John Doe, HR Generalistwww.linkedin.com/in/johndoe# 10 Years HR experience# 4+ Years Benefit and Compensation Analyst# Well-versed in creating Employee HandbooksIf you like what you see, I can formally introduce you.Thanks for your consideration.PaulI think the email is pretty self-explanatory, but to be on the safe side, I will explain each part. I have them marked by letters. (A) Quick reminder of how we are connected and/or know each other, (B) I mention money to get their attention, (C) I pitch my experience, listing 3 compelling reasons why I should be considered for the job, (D) I make one more plea for assistance. (E) I add a short email to intrigue the recruiter and convince them to connect with me. My connection has to do nothing but forward that note to a recruiter and should all go well, they are $500 richer.Make sense?In the event that you do not have any connections into a company, I would suggest first seeking out friends who have friends inside of the company you have an interest in. If you have the new Facebook Graph Search activated on your Facebook profile, you can do a search similar to this one: My friends of friends who work at Google.If I discover that I have friends of friends working at a company I am targeting, I would ask for an introduction and hopefully leverage that into an employee referral opportunity.I know this strategy works due to the experiences of a friend of mine. But, I am more curious as to how well this works for you. If you would, please leave me a comment and tell me what you think?Happy hunting!last_img read more

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